Wednesday, May 9, 2018

It's Time to Consider Arming Special Education Students




Given the number of school shootings over the last several decades it seems time we considered innovative approaches. It's been suggested that we employ armed security guards in the schools, but given budget constraints I think that's inadvisable. Likewise, we could arm our teachers, but discipline problems have become serious enough ( due to those same budget constraints) that that might entail the possibility of students and/or teachers being shot on a fairly regular basis, so we probably don't want that. There is an approach, however, that could potentially solve these problems, and a number of other problems in our schools at the same time. That is arming our special education students.

I know at first this might not seem to be the most obvious solution, but let us consider the benefits: Firstly, arming students in special education programs could do wonders for their self esteem, and their feeling of empowerment. For example, in the past they may have tried to make themselves inconspicuous on the bus going to school, or shied away from encounters with other students, and so they might greatly benefit from such a show of trust on the part of their teachers and their communities. Moreover, the savings to the taxpayers would be considerable, and it would give us the opportunity to introduce more guns into the community, an asset for those who believe strongly in the Second Amendment. Furthermore, for those of strong faith, we should remember the words from the sermon on the mount... "The meek shall inherit the earth." An approach like this might just give them a fighting chance.

Arming our special education students could also prove a deterrent to bullying in the schools, so there could be savings on anti-bullying programs, that might even prove to be no longer necessary. These students should, I believe, be given plenty of firepower for the above reasons. This is not to mention, of course, that almost any potential shooter would be discouraged by the thought of 50 or 60 such students in every school armed, not only with Glock 9 mm pistols, but M16 rifles, M60 machine guns (with ten or twenty thousand rounds of ammunition) and for more serious situations, shoulder-fired stinger missiles.

The combined benefits of higher self-esteem, the reduced need for bullying programs, and a positive cost/benefit ratio achieved through not needing to hire added security (and of course the deterrent factor) are, however, only the most obvious benefits of such a program. At the same time we would also be training these kids to take a positive role in their communities after graduation. Such training could give them the experience necessary to join the very special forces, or work in our big city police departments, where recruits of this kind are clearly valued very highly. Beyond that, they could look forward to careers in the American intelligence community, in the CIA, or the NSA, and other agencies where such abilities are obviously much appreciated by their country.

When it comes to protecting our children, and honoring our tax cuts, by making solutions cost effective, while also protecting the second amendment, there are not that many options. I hope the Trump administration, Congress, and state and local governments can all get onboard and see the potential impact of such an approach.

Brent Hightower
Copyright 2018 Brent Hightower
21stcenturyperceptions.blogspot.com